YouTube. The Ultimate Learning Hack.

Maybe you started a family. Maybe all your attention has been going toward your current career path. Maybe you’ve been immersed in your military service. For whatever reason, life got in the way of fully pursuing a field that interests you. If you’re looking to finally earn college credit for the knowledge you already have, DSST is the best way to do it. And if you need a quick refresher on any of that course material, we’ve pulled together some of the best YouTube education channels.

1. Khan Academy

With a mission to “provide a world-class education to anyone, anywhere” and the content to back it up, it’s tough to top Khan Academy when it comes to free online learning. Offering in-depth, approachable lessons in subject areas like science, math, engineering, history, computing, and the arts in more than 36 languages, Khan Academy checks every box. There are even playlists centered around topics like standardized test prep (SAT, GMAT, MCAT, etc.) and homeschooling. Just take a quick look at user comments like “Goodbye textbooks, hello Khan Academy!” for proof of how talented the Khan Academy professors are at presenting material in a logical and relatable fashion.

Check out Khan Academy

2. Crash Course

Perhaps the best way to describe Crash Course is as Khan Academy’s goofy, fun-loving sibling with a shorter attention span. Though topics like chemistry, history, and literature are covered extensively, you’ll also find more niche subject areas like intellectual property, astronomy, and film history. No matter which playlist you end up on, the Crash Course folks do a wonderful job of using fun graphics and humor to keep you engaged and informed.

Check out Crash Course

3. TED Ed

In true TED fashion, TED Ed playlists take traditional education topics and toss them into a culturally relevant or unexpected context. The result is a collection of videos that, though undoubtedly mind-opening, might not be as helpful in crunch time. We’re talking about titles like “Cyber-Influence & Power,” “Before and After Einstein,” and “Math in Real Life.” If you’re looking for interesting talking points for writing or collaborating, fresh perspectives to consider, or even inspiration for presenting, TED Ed is perfect. If you just need the facts fast, start with the first two resources above, and then check out TED Ed when you have more time.

Check out TED Ed

Bonus Head-scratchers

Feeling unusually curious and/or bored? In addition to the above “high road” destinations, we’ve pulled together some randomly informative and slightly irreverent channels that are always good for a laugh (and the occasional lesson). Enjoy!

Numberphile is a goofy, math-based go-to that includes calculator unboxings and Pi celebrations.

Vsauce features producer and host Michael Stevens as he explores the world’s most timeless curiosities, such as “How To Count Past Infinity”, “The Science of Awkwardness,” and “What Is The Speed of Dark?”

Utilizing a funky whiteboard aesthetic and guests like Bill Nye, AsapSCIENCE takes on science with a nothing-off-limits attitude. Think “Could We Record Our Dreams?” and “The Science of Cheating.”

Feel like you have a solid handle on the material? Try your hand at a DSST practice test, see where DSST tests are offered, and discover the thousands of reputable higher ed institutions that accept DSST credits.

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